Your Preparation For Research

Apr 7, 2018

Your Preparation For Research

The natural tendency in terms of the way your preparation works where you’re reading something first and you take notes on it and that’s the first thing that you’ve read and you think it might be the most important and the next article that you summarize and so those are that’s a midway point to get to the more sophisticated level of organizing things into themes and arguments also avoid more than the most basic absolutely necessary background information a way to look at this is to look at articles that you have and look at the purpose of different sentences in the introduction and you’ll see that there are very few that are devoted to purely background information which is the opposite of a lot of papers that you write for college classes that are asked to report all about a certain topic. Learn more about preparation process at Edusson.

So most of the sentences are reporting findings putting forth claims combined and claims and evidence into one sentence and that’s what most of the introduction is you only need a little bit of background information and can really boil down something that might be two paragraphs in an informational paper into one or two sentences to give the reader just enough background information for you to proceed your arguments in terms of framing arguments in your overall theme of your introduction and what you’re arguing for is what are you trying to figure out from your study and here there’s an example using berry atolls article differences in self-reported disclosure of college experiences by first-generation college student status so Barry and other authors focused on students who were the first person in their family to go to college in their first year of college and their patterns of self disclosure they were curious about do first-generation freshmen college students disclose less about college stress than non first-generation students and do first-generation students have a different support group than non first-generation students these are overall research questions.

These are not hypotheses yep moving towards a more specific hypothesis to make a prediction a very specific prediction these authors write that it was hypothesized that college freshmen would differ in their self-reported disclosure of their experiences depending on whether or not they were first-generation status and that you would see that across varying proximity of targets of disclosure and what that means is who was close to them and what sort of category did they fall into friends family members professors and so on but getting really specific into the testable prediction very at all and that means the at all means and other authors self-reported disclosure will be lower in first-generation freshmen than in non first-generation freshmen and that is the prediction that they are doing before they go out to collect their data so where do you think berry at all went looking for findings that would support their hypothesis and that helped them build their hypothesis along the way.